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Search results for: protective order

How Long Does a Protective Order Last?

Texas takes situations of domestic violence very seriously, which is why lawmakers implemented a process through which a victim can petition for an order of protection to guard against future abuse and misconduct. The petitioner (or movant) must file certain pleadings and comply with court procedural rules to obtain such an injunction initially, and there...

Can I Nonsuit a Protective Order Case in Texas?

The legal answer is – it depends! There have been situations where we have seen a judge refuse to let an applicant dismiss (or nonsuit) a request for a protective order based on the facts in the original suit and the supporting affidavit.

Have You Been Served With a Protective Order in Texas?

A protective order in Texas is a legal order that prohibits a person from having contact (physical, telephonic, electronic, etc) with the person or persons they are accused of abusing. Protective orders can be a life-saving tool for victims of domestic violence, but can also be extremely detrimental to those falsely accused of domestic violence. The result of an Order of Protection being ordered can include loss of access to and possession of children, being kicked out of the marital residence, losing your constitutional right to own firearms, and punitive costs and fines.

Protective Orders Attorney in Houston, Texas

Allegations of family violence are all too common in divorces and custody disputes. If violence or the threat of violence is present in your family, the Texas Family Code authorizes three different types of protective orders. All types of protection orders have serious consequences on family law cases.

Do You Need A Temporary Order?

A temporary order filed during a divorce in Texas tells the parties what they may and may not do while the case is pending. If children are involved, temporary orders establish provisions for support and visitation prior to the final trial. If there are issues of property, these orders establish specific types of property and who must pay certain bills until the case is finalized.