Holiday Activities For Kids in TexasAs the song says ” It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas”. Lights are glistening all over the city and you can feel the excitement in the air. There is so much to do with the kids. It doesn’t matter what you are doing, it can be something as simple as taking in the lights of the city while enjoying some hot chocolate. I encourage you to take advantage of the many activities throughout the city. You will be making memories for your children that will last a lifetime. Below are just a few of the opportunities going on throughout the city:

1. Zoo Lights

Zoo Lights is held beginning mid November continues on through the month of December. During Zoo lights, the Houston Zoo is transformed into a winter wonderland for all ages.

2. Santa’s Wonderland

Santa’s Wonderland, just an hour north of Houston in College Station, is a great time for the whole family. You can buy various tickets for to either drive through the Wonderland, walk or ride on a horse and carriage. After you are through with the lights, you can head in over to the village where you can eat, visit with Santa and warm up with some hot coco.

3. Festival of Lights

Festive of Lights is Galveston’s very own kickoff for the holidays with its annual full of fun, festival. The Festive of Lights is held at Moody Gardens in Galveston. Kids can take pictures with Santa, see the class holiday movies you grew up on a take a walk under the Christmas light displays. The Festival of Lights is held all the way until the New Year and January 7th.

4. Magical Winter Lights

The Magical Winter Lights is happening until January 2nd at Gulf Greyhound Park in La Marque where they light up various themed light displays. There is also a kid’s area, arts and crafts, holiday market and more.

5. Lights in the Heights

Lights in the Heights is held in the Heights neighborhood where the whole neighborhood gets in the spirit of the holidays and the event. During the event, people are able to walk throughout the neighborhood while enjoying the live music, food, hot chocolate and lights. Lights in the Heights is held the second Saturday in December (December 9th), however they are often left up throughout the whole season for people to enjoy.

6. Ice Skating at Discovery Green

Especially if the weather has not gotten into winter temperatures, Ice-skating at Discovery Green is the perfect way to cool down, while also getting in the spirit. Additionally, living in Houston, we do not get to experience real ice-skating on frozen ponds in the winter so this is certainly the next best thing. Discovery Green sets up their outdoor rink no matter the temperatures. There is not cost to get into the park but ice-skating will cost you rentals for the skates and entrance to the ice rink itself.

7. Breakfast with Santa

I certainly remember attending this event as a kid and would highly recommend it to anyone with little kids. The Downtown Aquarium restaurant will host its traditional Breakfast with Santa event. Santa may even make an appearance in the 500,000 gallon fish tank!

Agreed DivorceAfter working in family law for the past 14 years from an intern in a local family law court to running my own practice, I have decided to expand our Agreed reduced retainer Family law Services. The services we include:

  • Agreed Divorce
  • Agreed Motion to Modify
  • Agreed Child Name Change
  • Agreed Suit Affecting P/C Relationship (SAPCR)
  • Adult Name Change

New coverage areas for our uncontested reduced retainer services include the following cities:

  • Austin
  • Dallas/Fort Worth
  • San Antonio

At this point, we will only service counties offering electronic filing as it assures that we can finalize the case quickly without the additional cost of hand delivery or the filing pleadings via USPS.  Additionally, we are ONLY offering our services for agreed family law services including uncontested divorces, name changes, adoptions and agreed modifications.   We take pride in a high level of service to both local and remotely located clients.   If you are looking for a law firm that can get the job done at reduced retainers give us call or send us an email.

For more information please visit our uncontested divorce page.

Divorce For Dads™ - Activities for KidsDivorce for dads™ can be a scary situation given the potential unknown and inexperience with the care of children. Life will change for the parents, as well as for the children. Some divorced fathers are overwhelmed just trying to schedule activities and keeping the kids entertained. Divorce for dads™ can create a tight budget as they have to manage with less income due to the additional expense of spousal maintenance and child support.

If the budget is tight, then the mere idea can be an extra stressor for divorcing or divorced dads. Have no fear, single fathers; you are in luck because Houston has a plethora of activities and things to do with the kids for free or a low cost. Below are just a few examples of things to do with the kids that they will enjoy and you will too, without breaking the bank. Remember, it is not about the amount of money you spend on your children to show them love, but rather the quality time you spend with them.

    1. One of the many bike trails and various activities offered around Houston’s bayous, waterways, and parks (a few listed below)
      • Buffalo Bayou
      • Herman Park
      • Discovery Green
      • Memorial Park, Houston
      • Eleanor Tensely park
      • Market Square
    2. Museums
      • Free admission to the following museums on certain days
        • Buffalo Soldiers National Museum – Thursday 1 pm – 5 pm
        • Houston Museum of Natural Science – Thursday 2 pm – 5 pm
        • Museum of Fine Arts, Houston — Thursday 10 am – 9 pm — (Kids 12 & under free every day)
        • Children’s Museum of Houston — Thursday 5 pm – 8 pm; Power Hour: Get $2.00 off on admission every day after 5 p.m. (except on Thursdays)
        • The Health Museum — Thursday 2 pm – 7 pm
        • Holocaust Museum Houston – Thursday 2 pm – 5 pm
        • Houston Museum of African-American Culture — Thursday 6 pm – 8 pm
        • Czech Center Museum Houston – Last Monday each month, noon -4 pm
    3. The YMCA
      • One adult membership (with kids) is $72.00 per month
      • If you are interested in participating in the programs or activities but do not need the full use of the facility, program memberships are available where there is a Join Fee and discounted fee per month (Fees may vary on locations around Houston)
      • Membership for All available if you meet the financial requirements
      • https://search.ymcahouston.org/search/programs/
    4. Movies
    5. Libraries
      • Many of the city libraries offer free summer reading programs
      • This is a great way to keep up their reading skills over the summer months
    6. Water Activities
    7. For little builders
    8. Baseball
      • Sugar Land Skeeters Tickets
      • Discounted Field Box seats at select Skeeters’ games – $8.50 per ticket
      • Value ticket nights include $1 hot dog Wednesdays, family night and Friday night fireworks at the ballpark
      • Houston Astros tickets – http://m.mlb.com/astros/tickets/fan-value/
    9. Houston Zoo
    10. For the Animal Lover
      • Spotting Dolphins from the Galveston Island Ferry
      • It may be a little ways from the city but what a great opportunity to venture out of the City of Houston for the day to watch Dolphins while taking a ride on the Galveston Island Ferry on its way to Port Bolivar Peninsula
      • http://www.galveston.com/galvestonferry/

There will without a doubt that divorce for dads™ will require an adjustment period as you transition to the life of a single parent, however, that does not mean you need to miss out on spending quality time with your children. With these activities and the many other options in and around the City of Houston, a fun time will be had by all!

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The difference between a divorce and an annulment in Texas family law lies in the validity of the marriage. A divorce, puts a legal end to a valid marriage. An annulment, legally invalidates a marriage. It treats the marriage as if it never existed, but the petitioner (the person bringing the suit), must be able to prove the facts surrounding the marriage meet very specific statutory grounds.

Herein lies another difference between an annulment vs. a divorce in Texas family law; in a divorce, the parties may plead “no fault” and therefore do not have to prove the grounds of their divorce. This just means if you want an annulment, be prepared to go in front of the Judge with facts demonstrating you meet the statutory requirements.

How Will I Know If I Qualify for an Annulment?

In Texas, an annulment can only be granted if the following statutory grounds are met:

  • Underage
    If the marriage of a person 16 years or older but under 18 occurred without parental consent or court order, the court may grant an annulment. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.102. Unless a court order has been obtained, any marriage to a person under 16 will be declared void by the courts. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.205.
  • Intoxication
    If the petitioner was under the influence of drugs or alcohol and therefore did not have the capacity to consent to marriage, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the parties did not voluntarily cohabitate (live together) after sobering up. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.105. If you moved in together, and tried to make it work, you DO NOT meet the statutory grounds required to grant an annulment.
  • Impotency
    If at the time of the marriage, either party was permanently impotent, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the petitioner did not know of the impotency at the time of the marriage AND did not voluntarily cohabitate since learning of the impotency. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.106.
  • Fraud, Duress, or Force
    If fraud, duress, or force was used to induce the petitioner into marriage, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the petitioner did not voluntarily cohabitate with the other party since learning of the fraud or since being released from the duress or force. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.107.
  • Mental Incapacity
    The requirements for an annulment granted on the basis of mental incapacity depend on who is bringing the suit. If the petitioner is the person with the incapacity (or their representative), then the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF at the time of the marriage they did not have had the mental capacity to consent to the marriage or to understand the nature of the ceremony because of mental disease or defect AND they did not voluntarily cohabitate with the other party during a period when they possessed the capacity to recognize the marriage relationship.
    If the petitioner is the party without the mental incapacity, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the petitioner did not know of the mental disease or defect at the time of the marriage AND has not voluntarily cohabitated with the other party since the date they discovered (or reasonably should have discovered) the mental disease or defect. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.108.
  • Concealed Divorce
    If at the time of the marriage, the petitioner did not know that the other party was divorced from a third party within the 30 days prior to the ceremony, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the petitioner did not voluntarily cohabitate with the other party since learning of the fact of divorce. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.109.
  • Marriage Less Than 72 Hours After Issuance of License
    If the marriage ceremony took place within the 72 hours following issuance of the marriage license, the court may grant an annulment ONLY IF the annulment is sought within the 30 days following the ceremony. This is an important distinction between an annulment vs. a divorce in Texas. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.110.
  • Consanguinity
    If the parties are related too closely by blood, as close as or closer than cousins, the marriage will be declared void by the court. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.201.
  • Preexisting Marriage
    If either party is married at the time of the marriage ceremony, the later marriage will be declared void by the courts. However, if after the earlier marriage is dissolved, the parties continue to live together AND represent to others that they are married, the marriage can become valid. See Tex. Fam. Code §6.202.

These are the general grounds that will support an annulment in Texas. Anyone seeking more information about an annulment vs. a divorce in Texas should consider seeking the advice of an experienced family law attorney to see whether their individual circumstances meet the criteria, and what the benefits of seeking such an option might be.

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Divorce can be a challenging and painful process, even more so if someone in the relationship has been imprisoned. If you need to know how to divorce someone in prison, read on for more information. To schedule a consultation with one of our family law attorneys who can help guide you through the process of divorcing someone in prison, please contact us today.

There are two manners in which one can obtain a divorce from an imprisoned individual:

1. Obtain a divorce from an incarcerated individual through an uncontested divorce.

To obtain an uncontested divorce, you and your spouse would have to be in agreement with respect to getting divorced and to all related terms. If you and your spouse only have property and/or debt, you will have to be in agreement as to how those items get divided in the divorce. If you and your spouse have children, you will have to be in agreement as to conservatorship, possession and access, child support, and medical support. If you and your spouse have reached an agreement as to all of the above that apply to your situation, then you can proceed with an uncontested divorce.

In the process of an uncontested divorce, our office would be retained by you and would only represent you during the process and your spouse would have to be agreeable to not hiring his or her own attorney. He or she may still obtain legal advice by taking a copy of the decree drafted by our office to another attorney for review before signing.

Once retained by you, our office would file a petition for divorce on your behalf. After the petition was filed by our office, we would draft a document entitled “Waiver of Service” to be sent to your incarcerated spouse along with a copy of the filed petition for divorce. The Waiver of Service is a document that is signed by your spouse that indicates the he or she has received the petition and does not want to be served with formal notice of the divorce, among other things. The Waiver of Notice and the Petition can be mailed to your incarcerated spouse. Normally, a Waiver of Notice must be signed by the individual and notarized. However, effective September 1, 2015, the requirement that the waiver must be signed before a notary public does not apply if the party executing the waiver is incarcerated.

Once your incarcerated spouse has signed and returned the waiver, our office will prepare an Agreed Divorce Decree based on the agreement you have reached with your spouse. After you have approved the decree, you can forward the decree to your spouse for signature.

After you and your spouse have signed on the final decree, we will file it with the appropriate court along with all necessary supporting documents and coordinate your court appearance for a date more than sixty days after your original petition was filed. The Court appearance will be first thing in the morning in front of the Judge and will entail you answering questions under oath about your marriage, your residency, and your agreement with your spouse. At that hearing, the Court will grant your divorce.

2. Obtain a divorce from your incarcerated spouse through a contested divorce.

How can you divorce someone in prison if you cannot come to an agreement? If you cannot reach an agreement with your spouse, you may still file for divorce. As with the uncontested process, we would draft and file a petition for divorce on your behalf.

After the petition is filed, he or she would have to be personally served with the citation. If you are unable to have him or her personally served at the place where he is incarcerated, you will have to file a motion for alternative service to have the court allow you to serve your spouse by substituted or alternative service. If the Court grants substituted or alternative service, then you can proceed with service as ordered by the court.

Once your spouse has been served with the petition, he or she has until the Monday after the expiration of twenty days to file an answer with the court. If your spouse files an answer, our office can begin the contested process by either sending a proposal or attempting to coordinate mediation. If your spouse does not answer, even after the sixty-day waiting period has expired, you can appear before the Court and obtain a default divorce by having a hearing.

Schedule a Consultation Today

We understand that divorcing someone in prison is difficult situation, and the process itself can be frustrating and confusing. If you are interesting in learning more about how to divorce someone in prison, consider scheduling a consultation with one of our experienced Texas family law attorneys today. You can contact us online, or call our offices at [insert phone number].

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After a divorce, getting your life back on track can be a challenging process, especially if you’re trying to move out of state and navigate a custody agreement. Before you move out of state with your kids, read our blog to learn more about the process to ensure that you are operating within Texas family law.

If you still have questions, or would like to schedule a consultation with one of our attorneys to help you work through this process, please contact us today.

Moving Out of State with Custody and an Agreeable Spouse

First and foremost, if your spouse is agreeable to you relocating to another state with your kids, then you will be free to do. The divorce decree would have to specify that you are the conservator with the exclusive right to determine the primary residence without regard to geographic location or within a certain geographic area that includes the area to which you would like to relocate.

Please keep in mind that an agreement with your spouse could include a geographic restriction that includes more than one place. For example, you could agree to a geographic restriction that says that you have the right to establish the child’s residence within Houston (Harris and its contiguous counties) and/or your hometown.

Can I Move if My Spouse Is Not Agreeable?

If your spouse is not agreeable, it is likely that your ability to move could be restricted to a geographical area.

Section 153.001(a) of the Texas Family Code states:

The public policy of this state is to:

  1. assure that children will have frequent and continuing contact with parents who have shown the ability to act in the best interest of the child;
  2. provide a safe, stable, and nonviolent environment for the child; and
  3. encourage parents to share in the rights and duties of raising their child after the parents have separated or dissolved their marriage.

When rendering an order appointing parents as joint managing conservators, the court shall designate on conservator as the one the has the exclusive right to determine the primary residence of the child. Additionally, the court shall specify either the geographic area within which that conservator can establish the child’s primary residence or that the conservator can establish the child’s primary residence without regard to geographic area.

Factors the Court May Consider

The Texas Family Code does not explicitly state the factors a trial court should consider in deciding whether a geographic restriction would be in the best interest of the child. However, there are a number of things that courts have looked at in the past, including, but not limited to the following:

Reasons for and against the move

  • The opportunities afforded by the move
  • Whether the move could assist in meeting the child’s special needs or unique talents
  • The effect of move on relationships with extended family
  • The effect on the noncustodial parent’s visitation and communication with the child
  • The child’s age
  • The noncustodial parent’s ability to relocate

Also, it is important to note that even if you are appointed as sole managing conservator of your child the court still can restrict the ability to designate the primary residence of the child. Although the section of the Texas Family Code that deals with the appointment of the rights and duties of a parent who is appointed sole managing conservator does not specifically mention a geographic restriction, it does say that the rights can be limited by order of the court.

Schedule a Consultation

If you’re still unsure about whether you’re legally within your rights to move out of the state under your custody arrangement, make sure you consult with an experienced Texas family law attorney before you make any decisions. To speak with one of our attorneys regarding whether you can move out of the state with your children, please contact us today.

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If you’re recently divorced, you may be wondering, ‘Can my ex take my child out of state’? Depending on whether or not you and your former spouse had an agreement in place, the answer may be different. Read below to find out what factors determine whether or not a parent and ex-spouse is legally allowed to take your child across state lines.

If you need additional information or legal assistance, contact our office to schedule a consultation with our experienced Texas family law attorneys.

What If There is No Custody Agreement in Place?

Yes, if there is no custody agreement in place, your ex-spouse may take your child out of state.

Until there is an order of the court in place regarding custody, both parents have equal rights to possession and access of the child. This means that both parents can make decisions regarding the child, including where to go on vacation and whether or not to move out of state with the child. Although these actions may be frustrating, without a court order in place, they do not constitute kidnapping.

If you feel that the other parent of your child is thinking about moving out of the state, the best way to keep them from taking your child with them, is to speak to an attorney about getting a formal custody agreement in place. It is best to get the momentum on your side before the move, so acting sooner rather than later is key. The courts are much less likely to order that a child be returned to the jurisdiction than they are to order they remain in the jurisdiction.

What Can I Do Once an Agreement is In Place?

Once an agreement is in place, the parties’ rights to possession and access to the child will be set by order of the court. Generally, this will include a geographic restriction. For example, a final order in a suit for custody in Harris County, Texas will often include a provision restricting the residence of the child to Harris and contiguous counties. This is quite a large area including Montgomery, Liberty, Chambers, Galveston, Brazoria, Fort Bend, and Waller Counties.

A geographic restriction means that if the other parent is the joint managing conservator with the right to designate the residence of the child, they must do so within the geographically designated area. If you’re still wondering, but ‘can my ex move my child out state?’, you should know that the other parent would first need to file a motion to modify the order asking that the geographic restriction be removed and show that such a move would be in the best interests of the child.

What About Traveling Temporarily?

As far as traveling out of the state with the child, often once there is an agreement in place, the only requirement is that the domestic travel take place during their period of possession. Many agreements also require written notice outlining the child’s travel itinerary be provided a certain amount of time prior to the trip. Parties can even go so far as to require that the other parent consent before any domestic travel.

For international travel, there may be additional restrictions regarding passports and consent. If there are concerns about the other parent traveling with the child, make sure to discuss them with your attorney so that they can be addressed in the final order.

Schedule a Consultation

If you’re still uncertain about whether your ex can take your child out of state, make sure you speak with a Texas family law attorney to get the facts and know your rights. To get in touch with one of our attorneys regarding the custody arrangement with your ex-spouse, please contact us today.

Video Transcription:

In the State of Texas, the idea often referred to as ‘custody’ is referred to as ‘conservatorship’, while ‘visitation rights’ is known as ‘possession’. A Standard Possession Order is the statute which details who has ‘possession’ of the child or children when parents do not agree. Read on to learn more about the Texas Standard Possession Order, and if you still have questions, contact our office to set up a consultation with our experienced Texas family law attorney.

What is the Standard Possession Order in Texas?

The Standard Possession Order in Texas comprises of a weekend possession calendar, which is normally the 1st, 3rd, and 5th weekends and a Thursday during the school year, for a weekday period of possession. Parents also have to include a possession calendar for the holiday schedule, and need to determine when the holiday schedule would actually begin based on the school district that the child is enrolled in. If the child is not enrolled in school, the school district that he or she would be enrolled in.

To determine when the holidays would start, the schedule would technically include Thanksgiving. One year is to one custodial parent, and the following year the second custodial parent would have that holiday, meaning the parents would rotate, even in odd years. There are two halves of Christmas Break every year. Typically, the parent who exercised the Thanksgiving holiday will then have the second half of Christmas Break so that the other parent will then have Christmas, and will rotate that every year.

Typically, Christmas Break does start from the beginning of the Christmas Break or Winter Break for the school year and ends at noon on the 28th with the second parent picking up noon 28th and returning the child after school begins following the Christmas Break and will rotate that every year.

There’s also Spring Break every year. Again, custodial parents will rotate years even in odd years. Mother’s Day will have Mother’s Day weekends for mothers. Fathers will have Father’s Day weekends for fathers. The extended 30 day summer time, 30 days for the non-custodial parent.

On the child’s birthdays, if one parent is in possession of the child for the day, then the other custodial parent may come and pick up the child and the child’s siblings from 6 to 8 p.m. on their birthday to take them to dinner.

The Texas Standard Possession Order and schedule for your children is in lieu of the two parents actually having an agreement that outlines when said parents want to actually exchange their children. If the two parents decide on their own schedule and choose to put this order away in a drawer and never look at it, that is fine. But the minute you cannot agree, then you must refer to the order because that would be the least amount of time to which you you would be entitled.

Contact Experienced Family Law Attorneys

If you’re still unsure about how to create a visitation schedule with your ex-spouse, or require further clarification regarding the Texas Standard Possession Order, be sure to schedule an appointment with our team of experienced family law attorneys. Contact Ramos Law Group today.

If you’re curious about the benefits of mediation when you’re in the midst of a family law dispute, consider contacting a lawyer who has expertise in mediation. Watch the video featuring our board certified attorney Mary E. Ramos, or read our transcription below, to learn a few of the benefits of mediation and contact our team of experienced mediation lawyers at Ramos Law Group to schedule a consultation.

Mary E. Ramos on Mediation:

Ninety percent of cases are actually resolved in mediation. You and I will meet in one room and most of the time, the other attorney and their client will meet in a separate room and the mediator will then go back and forth between both rooms to try and come up with an agreement. Most of the time, one spouse starts with this type of idea where they think they want to be and so does the other spouse. So through the mediation process, we compromise to the point where we can both live with something that we can agree to and sign off on it.

If it’s something that the two of you actually create, it is probably more likely better and more beneficial for your children to follow a mediated settlement agreement, as opposed to allowing the judge to make a decision on your case, being a complete stranger and just another case in the long line of cases that that judge has to rule on that day. You keep control of making decisions on your divorce by participating in successfully coming to an agreement during the mediation process.

Another good advantage to mediation is once we sign off on a mediation settlement agreement, there is no backing out of it. No buyer’s remorse. It’s a done deal. You wouldn’t be able to call me tomorrow and ask, “I kind of don’t agree with what we did in mediation last night. Can I change my mind?”

So that saves a lot of money in trying to prepare to go forward and prepare for a hearing or a type of trial only to get down to the court and maybe being reset, have to come back on another day at the judge’s convenience, spending more money and time and not getting a result and not having the control that you would have over your life and your children and your finances.”

Contact Our Team Today

At Ramos Law Group, PLLC, our divorce lawyers work hard to ensure a positive outcome despite the difficult and challenging circumstances of your situation. If you still have questions about the benefits of mediation, contact our experienced mediation lawyers to schedule an appointment today.

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NOTICE:  THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS SENSITIVE DATA

201511111

IN THE MATTER OF § IN THE DISTRICT COURT
THE MARRIAGE OF §  
  §  
JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. §  
AND § 310th JUDICIAL DISTRICT
JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE §  
  §  
AND IN THE INTEREST OF §  
JILL “CAN’T WE JUST GET ALONG” DOE, A CHILD § HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS

AGREED TEMPORARY MUTUAL INJUNCTIONS

The Court examined the pleadings JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and finds that JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE are entitled to the joint and mutual temporary injunctions below.

IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED that the joint and mutual temporary injunctions are GRANTED, and JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE are immediately restrained, from:

  1. Communicating with the other party in person, by telephone, or in writing in vulgar, profane, obscene, or indecent language or in a coarse or offensive manner.
  2. Threatening the other party in person, by telephone, or in writing to take unlawful action against any person.
  3. Placing one or more telephone calls, anonymously, at any unreasonable hour, in an offensive and repetitious manner, or without a legitimate purpose of communication.
  4. Causing bodily injury to the other party or to a child of either party.
  5. Threatening the other party or a child of either party with imminent bodily injury.
  6. Destroying, removing, concealing, encumbering, transferring, or otherwise harming or reducing the value of the property of one or both of the parties.
  7. Falsifying any writing or record relating to the property of either party.
  8. Misrepresenting or refusing to disclose to the other party or to the Court, on proper request, the existence, amount, or location of any property of one or both of the parties.
  9. Damaging or destroying the tangible property of one or both of the parties, including any document that represents or embodies anything of value.
  10. Tampering with the tangible property of one or both of the parties, including any document that represents or embodies anything of value, and causing pecuniary loss to the other party.
  11. Selling, transferring, assigning, mortgaging, encumbering, or in any other manner alienating any of the property of Petitioner or Respondent, whether personalty or realty, and whether separate or community, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  12. Incurring any indebtedness, other than legal expenses in connection with this suit, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  13. Making withdrawals from any checking or savings account in any financial institution for any purpose, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  14. Spending any sum of cash in each party’s possession or subject to each party’s control for any purpose, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  15. Withdrawing or borrowing in any manner for any purpose from any retirement, profit-sharing, pension, death, or other employee benefit plan or employee savings plan or from any individual retirement account or Keogh account, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  16. Entering any safe-deposit box in the name of or subject to the control of Petitioner or Respondent, whether individually or jointly with others.
  17. Withdrawing or borrowing in any manner all or any part of the cash surrender value of life insurance policies on the life of Petitioner or Respondent, except as specifically authorized by this order.
  18. Changing or in any manner altering the beneficiary designation on any life insurance on the life of Petitioner or Respondent or the parties’ child.
  19. Canceling, altering, failing to renew or pay premiums, or in any manner affecting the present level of coverage of any life, casualty, automobile, or health insurance policies insuring the parties’ property or persons, including the parties’ child.
  20. Opening or diverting mail addressed to the other party.
  21. Signing or endorsing the other party’s name on any negotiable instrument, check, or draft, such as tax refunds, insurance payments, and dividends, or attempting to negotiate any negotiable instrument payable to the other party without the personal signature of the other party.
  22. Taking any action to terminate or limit credit or charge cards in the name of the other party.
  23. Discontinuing or reducing the withholding for federal income taxes on each party’s wages or salary while this case is pending.
  24. Destroying, disposing of, or altering any financial records of the parties, including but not limited to records from financial institutions (including canceled checks and deposit slips), all records of credit purchases or cash advances, tax returns, and financial statements.
  25. Destroying, disposing of, or altering any e-mail or other electronic data relevant to the subject matters of this case, whether stored on a hard drive or on a diskette or other electronic storage device.
  26. Terminating or in any manner affecting the service of water, electricity, gas, telephone, cable television, or other contractual services, such as security, pest control, landscaping, or yard maintenance, at 1214 Miramar Street, Houston, TX 77006 or in any manner attempting to withdraw any deposits for service in connection with those services.
  27. Entering, operating, or exercising control over the motor vehicle in the possession of Petitioner.
  28. Disturbing the peace of the child or of another party;
  29. Withdrawing the child from enrollment in the school or day-care facility where the child is enrolled without the written permission of the other party;
  30. Permitting an unrelated adult with whom either party has an intimate or dating relationship to remain in the same residence with the child between the hours of 10 P.M. and 8 A.M.
  31. Hiding or secreting the child from another party;
  32. Making disparaging remarks regarding any party or party’s family in the presence or within the hearing of the child;
  33. Allowing others to make disparaging remarks regarding any party or party’s family in the presence or within the hearing of the child;
  34. Consuming alcohol within the 24 hours before or during the period of possession of or access to the child;
  35. Transporting the child as a driver in a motor vehicle within the previous 8 hours of having consumed an alcoholic beverage, or permitting a third party who has consumed alcohol within the previous 8 hours to so transport the child;
  36. Ingesting, consuming, or using any narcotic substance within the 48 hours before or during the period of possession of or access to the child;
  37. Allowing others who have ingested, consumed, or used any narcotic substance within the 48 hours before or during the period of possession of or access to the child to have access to the child;
  38. Using corporal punishment for the discipline of a child or permitting anyone under either parent’s control to inflict such punishment upon either child;
  39. Communicating with each other through the child; nor
  40. Discussing any matters of the litigation with the child.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that each party is authorized only as follows:

To make expenditures and incur indebtedness for reasonable and necessary living expenses for food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and medical care.

To make expenditures and incur indebtedness for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses in connection with this suit.

To make withdrawals from accounts in financial institutions only for the purposes authorized by this order.

To engage in acts reasonable and necessary to conduct each party’s usual business and occupation.

Service of Writ and Waiver of Bond

JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE waive issuance and service of the writ of injunction, by stipulation or as evidenced by the signatures below.  IT IS ORDERED that JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE shall be deemed to be duly served with the writ of injunction.

This joint and mutual injunctions order is effective immediately and shall continue in force and effect until further order of this Court. This order shall be binding on JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR. and JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE; on JOHN “SHE’S NOTHING WITHOUT ME” DOE, JR.’s and NEDRA JANE “I MADE HIM WHAT HE IS” DOE’s agents, servants, and employees; and on those persons in active concert or participation with them who receive actual notice of this order by personal service or otherwise.

SIGNED on ___________________

 

________________

JUDGE PRESIDING

AGREED AS TO FORM AND SUBSTANCE:

 

_______________ _______________
JOHN DOE, JR. JANE DOE

 

AGREED AS TO FORM ONLY:

 

Ramos Law Group, PLLC Big Money & Associates, P.C.
1214 Miramar Street 3355 W. Alabama, Suite 444
Houston, Texas 77006 Houston, Texas 77098
Tel: (713) 225-6200 Tel.: (281) 555-5000
Fax: (713) 225-6201 Fax: (281) 555-5001
info@ramosfamilylaw.com Tex@bigmoneyassociates.com
 

 

By:______________ By:______________
Mary E. Ramos Big Tex NewHouse
State Bar No. 24045170 State Bar No. 24099999
Attorneys for JOHN DOE, JR Attorney for JANE DOE
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