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Everyone knows that marriage can be expensive. In 2017, Market Watch reported the average cost of a wedding exceeded $30,000. The expenses continue to pile up well after the vows are exchanged and the cake is cut.

However, many couples overlook another cost that almost half of them will also have to consider down the line: the cost of divorce. When facing the end of a marriage, you will want to know how much a Texas divorce will cost. Precise numbers can be difficult to find because not all attorneys maintain transparency in billing practices as the Ramos Law Group does.

The Financial Cost of Divorce in Texas

While the price of dissolving a marriage varies widely, the average Texas divorce costs hover around the $20,000 mark. In the most basic and amicable dissolutions where no children or property are involved, divorce cost in Texas could be as low as a few hundred dollars. While typically not advised, divorcing couples are technically able to prepare their own divorce petitions or file boilerplate forms to curtail the majority of attorney fees. Even so, the easiest separations still require filing fees and court costs, so it’s nearly impossible to leave a marriage completely free of any financial toll.

In the more common scenario, where parties hire family law attorneys to provide guidance and expertise to help navigate the process, the average range of divorce cost in Texas is between approximately $15,000 to $25,000 dollars. For childless couples or those without children under the age of 18, divorce costs tend to be toward the lower end of that
spectrum, while divorces involving children are often on the higher side.

Cost-Affecting Circumstances

Texas divorce costs deviate greatly, even from the average, depending on the circumstances. A relatively simple, attorney-assisted divorce might be resolved for $3500, while it is not unusual to see divorce costs reach the six-figure mark when matters are hotly contested, or the divorcing individuals have a high net worth.

It is common for divorcing spouses to underestimate the amount of time and work involved in unwinding the many ways their lives are intricately intertwined. In addition to attorneys being needed to manage the legalities of the process, accountants, and other financial experts are often called upon to assist in equitably dividing assets, including retirement accounts, real estate and other marital property. When children are involved, there may be a need to hire co-parenting counselors or child therapists. There are many ways to incur Texas divorce costs beyond the expected legal and court fees.

The Lesser-Considered Costs of Divorce

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When examining divorce cost in Texas, many people naturally tend to tally up the variety of financial charges associated with the separation. The costs of divorce beyond the direct expenses are often overlooked. So, what is the cost of divorce in Texas, really?

Divorce is usually a monumental and life-altering event for those involved -and that includes not just the divorcing spouses, but also their children, extended family, and friends. Divorce brings emotional and social costs that can be far-reaching, and it can take a toll on the mental and physical health of those affected.

The Effects of Divorce on Family Members

When spouses decide to go their separate ways, there are no family members who are unaffected. Children living in their parents’ home are faced with considerable stress during a parental breakup. This often involves being displaced from the family home they have known or adjusting to a new life without both parents within the home. Other challenging divorce costs sometimes include adjusting to economic hardships, balancing relationships between separated parents, and potential bouts of sadness and depression.

Similarly, in-laws and other extended family members may find coping with your divorce to be a struggle of their own. Grandparents may fear losing opportunities to bond with their grandchildren following the end of their child’s marriage – particularly those on the side of the noncustodial parent, or if the divorce results in the estrangement of one parent.

Other family members may also feel hesitant or disloyal when trying to maintain a healthy relationship with former in-laws. Friends of the divorcees also often find themselves caught in the fray of choosing sides and balancing allegiances following the end of a marriage. The cost of divorce frequently extends beyond one’s bank account. Divorce cost in Texas includes a surcharge on the well-being of every party affected.

Invest in the Best Possible Outcome

Few spouses enter into a marriage with plans for their union to fail. Unfortunately, there are times when divorce cannot be avoided. In those instances, it is always helpful to have a dedicated and experienced attorney available to help guide you through the arduous process and to ensure that your welfare and interests are protected. Texas divorce costs can be high -with so much at risk, one cannot afford to be lax about legal representation.

Ramos Law Group has spent years helping families overcome divorce. Our team can assist you with managing divorce cost in Texas and making sure that the transition from your marriage is as smooth as possible. Reach out to us for professional insight on how to not just cope with divorce, but how to successfully see yourself to the other side. Contact Ramos Law Group today to schedule your consultation.

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Online Divorce Services Are Gaining Popularity

Have you been thinking about getting a divorce? If so, with minimal research, you’ve probably encountered numerous advertisements and articles about online divorce in Texas. This is not by chance. “Online divorce Texas” and “online divorce in Texas for free” are popular search terms because spouses considering divorce are often looking for a simple, inexpensive, or low-stress option to help deal with this high-stress situation. While the prospect of an inexpensive marriage dissolution might seem like a ray of sunshine in the midst of a storm, cutting corners on legal representation with a do-it-yourself divorce can actually cost you significantly more than hiring solid legal counsel in the first place.

Not the Time for DIY

Divorce is a process that manages to affect almost everyone you love and everything you have worked hard to obtain: your children, finances, home, and more. All of your family and possessions must go through the divorce process with you. As such, you will want to make sure that an online divorce in Texas or any approach to divorce you take is the best decisions for yourself, your family and your future. In most cases, that means hiring an experienced divorce attorney who you can trust to help protect your interests and well-being through this difficult time.

While the popularity of do-it-yourself projects has been on the rise in recent years, such undertakings are best suited for remodeling a room or building a piece of furniture. Attempting to go through a divorce, one of life’s most consequential and taxing events, as an online divorce in Texas is likely to result in confusion, frustration, and dissatisfaction – and that is if you are lucky. In less fortunate scenarios, you could end up dealing with errant court orders that do not address financial support, property division, child custody, and other major issues as intended.

Once court orders have been entered, making changes to them can be difficult. Modifications to orders typically require the filing of a new suit, which can carry a monetary cost equal to that of a divorce, if not more. And the additional time and effort required to litigate a new matter guarantee the cost will be more than financial, which is why it is so important to ensure quality legal representation during initial divorce proceedings.

Can Vs. Should

Although Texas spouses have the ability to file their own divorce paperwork and represent themselves in family court, doing so is often ill-advised. As the saying goes: Just because something can be done does not mean that it should. It’s unlikely that any path to an online divorce in Texas for free will yield the best results for you and your family.

If you are looking for true peace of mind and the best possible result to your divorce, consider hiring a reputable family attorney who can guide you through the divorce process, answer your questions and concerns, and get things done correctly the first time. The experienced team at Ramos Law would be happy to help you navigate the divorce process. Call today to schedule a consultation.

          Before you even speak to an attorney, it may be helpful to know what court has jurisdiction over your divorce.  Knowing how the Judge in your case is likely to rule and what their pet peeves are can be incredibly beneficial to the presentation of your case so it is important to speak to an attorney who practices often in the jurisdiction in which you will ultimately file your case.  Read this article before you start reaching out to attorneys to make sure you are scheduling a consultation with an attorney who is going to be knowledgeable in your jurisdiction.

                                                              

           The general rule for jurisdiction in a Texas divorce is that at least one spouse must have been a domiciliary of Texas for the preceding 6 month period and a resident of the county in which the suit is filed for the preceding 90 day period.  This means that if the filing spouse is not a resident of Texas, a suit for divorce can still be maintained in Texas if he other spouse has been a domiciliary of Texas for the preceding 6 month period.  Generally, a person has been domiciled in Texas if they have resided in the state with the intent to make Texas his or her “fixed abode”.   The court will consider many factors in determining a person’s “fixed abode” including where a person spends most of their time, where they receive mail, what address is used to file a tax return, where does a person register their vehicle, whether they have a Texas drivers license, and where a person is registered to vote.  A number of factors are considered in determining whether one intends to make a residence a fixed abode so if you are not sure if you or your spouse has been domiciled in Texas for the requisite period of time, it is best to talk to an attorney. 

 

           There are several exceptions to the general rule outlined in the paragraph above for members of the armed forces.  First, time that a spouse spends in the armed forced outside of Texas is still considered residence in the State of Texas and in the county in which they lived.  If you are not sure whether your spouse was previously domiciled in Texas, look at his or her Military Paystub (LES) and see what it lists as their home state.  This will be a strong indicator that they are a domiciliary of Texas.  Second, a spouse is stationed in Texas can meet the jurisdictional requirements despite the fact that they may not intend to make Texas their permanent residence as long as they have been stationed in Texas for the preceding 6 month period and in the filing county for the preceding 90 day period.  These exceptions provide some jurisdictional flexibility for members of the armed forces and their spouses.

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If you’re considering handling your own divorce paperwork and proceedings, you’re not alone. There are many couples who start the divorce process without representation from an attorney. While this practice is legal, it can be dangerous when people believe in several common myths about divorce before trying to start a do-it-yourself divorce in Texas.

The feasibility of getting a divorce without an attorney can change considerably depending on the details of your marriage, and the type of divorce you will need. This is generally only possible during an uncontested divorce, when both parties agree on every detail, including about how community property will be split. If there are any disagreements, however, you’re in for a contested divorce and should seek representation immediately.

Finding the right Information

You may have friends and family members who have been through a divorce, and may feel like you have a good idea of the process, but every state has their own laws and regulations concerning the requirements for issuing a final divorce decree. These laws can change over time due to new legislation and court rulings affecting Texas divorce. Do-it-yourself attempts at divorce may seem like a money saving move in the short-term, but you stand to lose more in the long-run if you have the wrong information.

If you go into your do-it-yourself divorce in Texas with the wrong information, you may make decisions that could hurt your case. That’s why it’s crucial to seek advice from an experienced divorce lawyer as your first move toward a divorce, or as soon as you are notified of your spouse’s divorce intentions. Your divorce lawyer can tell you the truth about how divorce works and debunk many of the myths surrounding it. Here are the top 10 myths about do-it-yourself divorce in Texas.

1. Divorce can be denied. In Texas, you do not have to prove fault in order to have the court grant the divorce. Therefore, even if you don’t want the divorce and your spouse does, the judge will still grant the divorce. Once all the financial, custody, and visitation issues have been resolved at settlement or trial, a divorce will be granted.

2. If you commit adultery, you’ll lose everything. Some people mistakenly believe they cannot have a do-it-yourself divorce in Texas because adultery is involved. Just because someone has been unfaithful during the marriage doesn’t mean that they’ll lose their home, kids, assets, and rights during the divorce. This can still be used as an argument by the other spouse to try to gain more of community property acquired during the marriage, but this argument is not usually seen as a large factor determining the division of property. If the person who has been unfaithful wastes community assets during the course of committing adultery, that factor will likely be taken into consideration during a property division.

3. Mothers are always awarded custody of children. In the past, there was a legal bias in favor of mothers, but the law has evolved so that both fathers and mothers can have the primary right of possession. The court makes decisions about custody and visitation that are in the best interests of the child. If you’re a concerned father, we recommend speaking to an experienced divorce lawyer for men.

4. You can avoid paying child support. Child support payments in Texas are established by law. Unfortunately, some people have the mistaken impression that they can avoid paying child support in Texas divorce through a do-it-yourself divorce. If you have a minor child and you are not the custodial parent, you will have to pay child support. If you fail to comply with a child support order, both your spouse and the state of Texas can take steps to enforce those orders.

5. I can deny visitation to my ex if they don’t pay the child support we agreed upon. Access to the children and parenting time are not related to the payment of child support. There is a process for enforcing child support obligations, but threatening or denying a parent visitation is not one of them. Initiating a do-it-yourself divorce in Texas does not mean you can decide to withhold visitation from your spouse.

6. Only Women get maintenance payments. Decisions about spousal support, just like custody decisions, are no longer are based on gender. Women may be ordered to pay alimony following a divorce if they earn more than their husbands. Decisions about spousal support are based on the economic realities of the respective spouses regardless of their gender. Do-it-yourself divorces in Texas are no different. If you are considering a divorce and expect child support or alimony to be a contested issue, it’s important to schedule a consultation with a competent attorney to protect your rights.

7. Children get to decide who they live with. If a child has reached the age of 12 and has expressed a preference as to which parent they would like to live with, a judge may decide to take that fact into consideration in the determination as to custody. The judge is not required to follow a child’s choice and will make their custody decisions based on what is in the best interests of the child during your Texas divorce. Do-it-yourself divorces are no different in this regard.

8. Divorce always leads to battles. Divorce can often be full of hostility, blame, and finger-pointing, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Do-it-yourself divorces in Texas have the best results when all parties agree, but this is not an effective means of de-escalating the divorce process. Other methods such as collaborative divorce, mediation, and negotiation are all options if you are trying to keep the divorce from becoming highly contested. If you tell your attorney that you would rather focus on resolving conflicts as opposed to starting or escalating them, the attorney can help make your divorce a process of negotiation and agreement rather than argument.

9. Equitable distribution results in equal division. Property in Texas is divided based on what is just and right in light of the circumstances. Property can be and often is divided in an unequal manner based on the many factors that go into a judge’s decisions about property division. Whether that property is divided 50/50 is not one of them.

10. You must have a lawyer. You have a right to represent yourself in your own do-it-yourself divorce in Texas, but it is not always the best option. You could make errors that harm you in the future. Once the judge signs the Final Decree of Divorce, there is nothing about the property division that can be changed. You may also make mistakes regarding your children and child support that could be difficult to change later.

If you’re thinking about getting a divorce in Texas, contact the offices of Ramos Law Group for a consultation. We’re here to help. Call us today to schedule a consultation.

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There may be a time when you need to get copies or verification of your divorce records. For example, you may need to show them to an employer or a state organization so that you can give cause for a name change. You may need to show them to a governmental entity so that you can receive some type of assistance. Furthermore, you may need your Texas divorce records so that you take some steps to move on with your new life. Divorce records in Texas are public, so anyone can access them by following a few simple steps. These steps are the same regardless of whether you want to access public divorce records in Texas from your home or in person at the clerk’s office.

What You’ll Need Before Starting

  • In order to access a Texas public divorce records, you’ll first need to gather some important information:
  • The full name of the party/ person you’re searching for
  • The date and place of divorce
  • The relationship with the person
  • The type of order
  • The reason for wanting the information

Obtain a Certified Copy at the District Clerk’s Office

Parties to the divorce (the divorcing couple) may obtain certified copies of their divorce decree from the District Clerk’s office. Since certified copies of divorce decrees are only available in person, you will need to visit the district clerk in the county or district where the divorce was filed.

Obtain a Verification Letter from the Texas Vital Statistics Unit Website

If you’re seeking verification of your divorce, but you don’t need a certified copy of the final decree, you can visit the Texas Vital Statistics Unit for a divorce verification letter. You may request a divorce verification letter online or by mail from the Texas Vital Statistics Unit. Divorce verification letters are different from certified copies of the final divorce decree, and they’re not a substitute for providing a final divorce decree when one is needed for legal purposes.

Verification for divorce decrees is available for divorces that have been filed since 1968. The website for the Texas Vital Statistics Unit contains an index of public divorce records in Texas by year, and you can search these records on the website. These records may be purchased or downloaded for free from the website.

Try an Online Search

Although requesting information by mail is fairly easy, it usually takes much longer to obtain your divorce records by mail as opposed to by online. In today’s world, it’s extremely easy to find a lot of publicly accessible information online. A quick search for “public divorce records in Texas” via popular search engines will reveal websites where you can access Texas public divorce records. Some of these websites may require registration or a fee to access some public records. Even some ancestry research websites provide access to public divorce records in Texas.

If you have questions, or if you’re considering divorce, call Ramos Law Group today. We’re here to help.

Divorce is a difficult and painful process for almost any couple experiencing the end of a marriage partnership. Making decisions about property division and custody arrangements can be extremely stressful and emotionally-charged for the parties involved. Divorce becomes even more complicated when one party becomes pregnant before the divorce is finalized. Couples who are considering getting a divorce in Texas while pregnant will face some additional steps throughout the divorce process due to the pregnancy.

Waiting Period

Texas requires almost all couples to wait sixty days before finalizing a divorce, regardless of whether or not one of the spouses is pregnant. A divorce in Texas while a spouse is pregnant is unlikely to be finalized until after the baby is born. Courts in Texas typically wait to finalize the divorce until after the birth of the baby so that orders regarding the child can be included in the final divorce decree. (One of the few exceptions to this rule is in the case of domestic violence.) Therefore, if the pregnancy is already a few months along, the waiting period shouldn’t take much longer than the two months already required by Texas law. Even if the divorce is contested, it’s unlikely the pregnancy would delay the process since contested divorces often take longer than the length of a pregnancy.

Paternity Issues

Divorces in Texas involving a pregnant spouse become more complex when the paternity of the unborn child is in question. In this case, the husband will need to file documents with the court denying paternity of the baby. If the biological father will not agree to sign an acknowledgment of paternity, the court will need to order the biological father to take a paternity test. If the paternity test verifies the identity of the biological father, the divorcing husband will need to file for the court to adjudicate parentage so that the court can name the father in the final divorce decree.

 

Child Support

Husbands who are unable to prove they are not the biological father of their wife’s unborn child will still be subject to paying child support since the court views children born during the marriage as being the husband’s children. A husband who strongly believes he is not the father of his wife’s baby can petition the court to order a paternity test. This process may be necessary once the baby is born to determine who the father is.

Although getting a divorce in Texas while pregnant adds an additional layer of complication to the divorce process, it is possible to navigate this complex territory by finding a good Texas divorce attorney. Working with the right legal experts will provide you with the knowledge and guidance you desperately need during one of the most difficult times of your life. If you’re facing a divorce and you need trusted, expert legal guidance, contact Ramos Law Group today to schedule a consultation.

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Military divorces — divorces where one or both of the spouses are active duty military personnel, in the National Guard, or reservists — often require additional steps and procedures to finalize as compared to civilian divorces. Most states, including Texas, have laws and procedures that only pertain to military divorces. There are also federal laws that govern the steps necessary to finalize a military divorce in Texas. This is why it’s important for service members and their spouses to consult with Texas military divorce lawyers to ensure their divorce proceedings are conducted according to all of the requirements found in both state and federal law.

Protection from Military Divorce in Texas

Federal laws exist to protect active duty military members from being divorced by their spouses without knowing an action has been filed in federal court. Under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), and in the discretion of the local court, a military divorce in Texas may be postponed while the service member is on active duty and for an additional 60 days afterward. Active duty service members may waive these protections if they wish to continue with the divorce proceedings as soon as they are filed.

Serving an Active Duty Military Spouse

In order for a Texas court to hear the divorce proceedings involving an active duty military spouse, the active duty member must be served in person with divorce papers. It is also possible for the spouses of military members to file a waiver affidavit not to be served in person, but this is only possible when the divorce is uncontested.

Residency and Filing Requirements

The grounds for filing for a military divorce in Texas are the same as those for civilians. Divorces are usually filed where a couple lives, but this is not always possible for military couples on active duty. Active members of the military may be deployed at any time, and that can cause problems when planning a military divorce. Some couples may not have lived in a state long enough to establish residence. Texas military divorce lawyers can help individuals determine whether or not they meet the residency requirements for obtaining a divorce in Texas. If a divorcing couple meets the residency requirements for a state other than Texas, military divorce lawyers may advise their client to file for divorce in the other state.
In order to proceed with a military divorce in Texas, either the active duty member or their spouse must have been a resident of Texas for at least six months and a resident of their county for three or more months. The active duty service member must be stationed in Texas for these residency requirements to apply. If the active duty service member is deployed or stationed in a different state, then the process may require filing in a different state.

Property Division

The rules regarding the division of property and marital assets in military divorces in Texas are the same as those for civilian marriages, but there are federal laws governing the division of military retirement benefits. Division and disbursement of military retirement assets are determined in accordance with the guidelines set by the Uniformed Services Former Spouses’ Protection Act (USFSPA). In order for a dependent spouse to receive any disbursement from retirement benefits, the couple must have been married for at least ten years while the military member was on active duty. Federal law grants direct partial payments of military retirement to spouses married to a soldier for at least ten years, but military divorce in Texas requires the division of any future military retirement benefits that accrued during the marriage regardless of its length.

Divorcing couples must include a section in the divorce decree that spells out provisions for the Survivor Benefit Plan premiums, if any, as well as the length of the marriage, the time on active duty service and the computed amount of the retirement payments the spouse will receive if any. Health care benefits will also continue for the minor children and, if the marriage lasted for 20 years, the spouse as well, so the soldier will be required to obtain military identification cards for his dependents as needed. Because of these unique circumstances, it is important to consult with a Texas military divorce lawyer who understands the specific requirements for finalizing a military divorce in Texas.

Custody, Child Support, and Spousal Support

The normal Texas child support guidelines, worksheets, and schedules are used to determine the amount of child support to be paid in a military divorce in Texas. Although support orders in Texas are decided according to the normal guidelines for support determination, the support may not exceed 60 percent of the pay and allowances of the active duty member.

Parents who are divorcing in Texas must agree on a written parenting plan or allow a judge to enter an order regarding conservatorship and possession, the terms used for custody and visitation. Military couples must consider what will happen if the active duty member is deployed or sent to another location. For example, in military divorces in Texas, a deployed service member may ask the court to allow extra visitation after they return. Therefore, the parties might agree to include an automatic provision to that effect in their parenting plan. They might also agree to let the child’s grandparents visit with the child while the service member is away.

Starting The Process

With the assistance of a Texas military divorce lawyer, actions filed in Texas are generally the same as most other divorces, with the exception of some specific requirements for the action to proceed within the state. Active duty military members should always work with an experienced law firm that is familiar with military divorces in Texas. It is important during a military divorce to know the best way to handle concerns such as jurisdiction, child custody, and division of property as it applies to a military member to let divorcing couples reach the most favorable resolution for their individual situation.
The board-certified attorneys at Ramos Law Group can help. Contact us to start the process of achieving the best possible result for your case.

Being agreeable while ending your marriage can save both of you from unnecessary grief and litigation cost. But there are important reasons to contest a divorce, times when you should choose not to compromise with your soon-to-be former spouse.

The first reason is plain and simple – when you believe the safety and welfare of your children will be jeopardized if you choose to compromise. Let’s be honest, when it comes to divorce emotions run high and all too often parties get hung up on “besting” the other parent to the detriment of their children. A zero-sum game framework is not conducive to a healthy co-parenting relationship.

Designation of Primary Conservatorship

The number one issue we’ve seen driving contested divorces in Texas is when parents disagree on who will decide the primary residence of the children. The parent with this right is designated as the primary conservator. This parent gets to designate the primary residence of the children and generally is also the parent who will receive child support. This is certainly an important right, but in practical application, it may mean much less than you think. This is because conservatorship in Texas consists of two parts – designated by the Court as “rights and duties” and “possession and access”. Just because a party has the right to designate the primary residence of the children does not mean that they have the exclusive right to make all other decisions for your children. All other rights listed below can be designated exclusively to one parent, joint (decision must be made together), or independently (each parent can make the decisions on their own), so just because you are not the primary conservator does not mean that you do not get to have a say in important parenting decisions. You need to consider these aspects when preparing for a contested divorce in Texas.

Parental rights independent of sole conservatorship

  • The right to consent to medical, dental, and surgical treatment involving invasive procedures.
  • The right to consent to psychiatric and psychological treatment of the children.
  • The right to receive and give receipt for periodic payments for the support of the children and to hold or disburse these funds for the benefit of the children.
  • The right to represent the children in legal action and to make other decisions of substantial legal significance concerning the children.
  • The right to consent to marriage and to enlistment in the armed forces of the United States.
  • The right to make decisions concerning the children’s education.
  • Except as provided by section 264.0111 of the Texas Family Code, the right to the services and earnings of the children.
  • Except when a guardian of the children’s estates or a guardian or attorney ad litem has been appointed for the children, the right to act as an agent of the children in relation to the children’s estates if the children’s action is required by a state, the United States, or a foreign government.
  • The duty to manage the estates of the children to the extent the estates have been created by community property or the joint property of the parent.

Authority over the visitation schedule is important and can be a major issue affecting contested divorces in Texas. If you ask for an expanded standard possession schedule the time each parent gets to spend with the children is nearly even. With an expanded standard possession schedule, possession and access begins and ends at the time the children start and are dismissed from school. So, instead of picking up the children at 6:00 PM on Friday and dropping them off on Sunday at 6:00 PM, you will pick them up at school on Friday afternoon and return them to school on Monday morning. This gives you one extra overnight period of possession. Additionally, instead of having the children for Thursday dinners during the school year from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM that same evening, you get the children from the time they are released from school on Thursday until they return to school on Friday morning every week during the regular school year.

With all of the above in mind, if you believe that the safety and welfare of your children will be endangered by compromising on a specific issue, then it’s absolutely a reason to contest your divorce. Attorney’s fees can get expensive during contested divorces in Texas, but some issues are too important to avoid during a divorce – if you do not bring them up now, you may not have the opportunity later. Modifying an existing order can be difficult – you have the burden to show a material change in circumstances since the underlying order was signed. Except in very limited circumstances, you cannot introduce evidence of things which took place prior to the divorce. Furthermore, if an issue was not important enough to bring up in the initial proceedings, the Court will require good cause to show it is important enough to modify an order after the fact.

It is important to weigh the costs and benefits of any legal action in your divorce. However, when it will benefit your children in the long run, this may be the time to dig in your heels and fight.

In your divorce, fighting only for the sake of “winning” will only draw out the process and negatively impact everyone involved. If both of you are excellent parents who love and care for your children, an uncontested divorce will minimize the impact on your children – and you.

Putting it all Together

Before you initiate your contested divorce in Texas, it’s important to decide if your reasons to contest the divorce are worth the added time and expense for you, the other party, and for your children. An expert attorney will help you determine the best course moving forward, working to the best possible outcome for all involved. If you’re looking for a divorce in the greater Houston area, contact Ramos Law Group and schedule your initial consultation with some of Texas’ best Family Law attorneys.

It is February and that means love is in the air. Valentine’s Day means candy and flowers for adults, but you don’t want to forget the kids! For children going through and caught in the middle of their parents’ divorce, it is an extra important to remind them they are loved and cherished. Try sending a sweet note in their lunch box, use a heart shaped cookie cutter to cut their sandwich, make a special dinner for you and the kids, or stay in and have a carpet picnic or movie night. You can even take them out on a one-on-one date. It doesn’t have to be a five-star restaurant; just being together will make it more special. You could potentially help them create cards for their siblings. Think about being crafty with their valentine cards, decorative cute little card boxes and fun treats for school!

Valentine’s Day is filled with so much excitement and celebration for the kids at school. It is excitement for them and perhaps a little pressure for the parent to try to come up with cute ideas. Be creative! If you search the internet, you can find printable valentines and tons more. If you want to go the extra mile, spend time with your child creating homemade treats for their classmates. This bonding can be fun, and it doesn’t have to be expensive or even intimidating. Kids still get excited at elementary school parties dumping out their Valentine’s Day box to see their cards and enjoying all the treats. It is certainly an excuse to let you kids eat as much candy and junk food as they want – just make sure they brush their teeth extra well that night! Below are some great ideas to make with your children. You not only get to spend quality time by creating something together, you also get to help ensure their class party is a little extra special this year. The only thing that truly matters is that they know they are loved this Valentine’s Day and every day.

  1. Chocolate Covered Strawberry Hearts

http://onelittleproject.com/chocolate-covered-strawberry-hearts/

  1. Valentine’s Marshmallow Pops

http://www.glorioustreats.com/2011/02/valentines-marshmallow-pops.html

  1. Strawberry Roses

https://www.spendwithpennies.com/how-to-make-strawberry-roses/

  1. Apple Sandwich hearts

http://www.happytogetherbyjess.com/hearts-in-apple-sandwich/

  1. Heart rice krispie pops

https://www.skiptomylou.org/heart-rice-krispie-pops/

  1. Fruit kabobs

https://shmallergy.wordpress.com/2012/02/13/cupids-arrows-valentines-day-fruit-kabobs/

  1. Red velvet sandwich cookies

http://www.bakerella.com/easy-and-easier-valentine-treats/

  1. Chocolate sticks

http://www.superziper.com/2011/01/palitinhos-de-chocolate.html

  1. Valentine’s bark

https://lilluna.com/valentines-bark/

  1. Dipped and decorated pretzels

http://www.5minutesformom.com/49632/kid-friendly-dipped-and-decorated-pretzels-for-valentines-day/

  1. Pink Fuzzy Monster Cupcakes

http://thecakeblog.com/2014/01/diy-love-bug-cupcakes.html

  1. Chocolate Sprinkle Donuts

https://www.lovefromtheoven.com/valentines-day-donuts/

  1. Valentine’s Brownies

https://www.itsalwaysautumn.com/shot-house-valentines-brownies.html

  1. Home made Pop Tarts

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/213567/home-made-top-tarts/?internalSource=streams&referringId=1417&referringContentType=recipe%20hub&clickId=st_trending_b

  1. Chocolate Chip Cookie Heats

https://princesspinkygirl.com/chocolate-chip-cookie-hearts/

  1. Marbled Valentine Sugar Cookies

https://www.bakedbyrachel.com/marbled-valentine-sugar-cookies/

  1. Valentine’s Day Ladybug Oreo Treats

http://formodernkids.com/valentines-day-ladybug-oreo-treats/

  1. Valentine’s Day Chocolate Teddy Bear Bites

https://productivepete.com/2018/01/17/make-chocolate-teddy-bear-bites/

  1. Valentine’s Candy Dog

http://kidfriendlythingstodo.com/2018/01/valentines-candy-dog-fun-kids-craft-treat/

  1. Valentine’s Day Popcorn

http://www.twosisterscrafting.com/valentines-day-popcorn/

These are not only adorable but also look delicious and something your kids class with certainly love to eat on to help celebrate the day! I can promise you that they will certainly remember the time spent together to make their Valentine’s Day all the more special for a while to come.

Sex Change Impact On Divorce

“My spouse has transitioned from one gender to another during our marriage, how does that impact our divorce?” For purposes of this question, I am assuming that the spouses were of opposite gender on the date of marriage, as the issue of same-sex marriage in Texas is best left for another entry and could confuse the issues here.

The truth is, that such a question depends on a very fact specific analysis of the history of your relationship, as is the case with almost every issue that can arise in a divorce.

If there are no children, then the answer is, there is not an impact based solely on the fact that your spouse transitioned.  You and your spouse would be divorced, just as any other couple married in Texas.  In regards to the division of property, transitioning alone is not a statutory basis for which a party could request the court to award a disproportionate share of the division of assets.

If there are children, then the answer is, there could be an impact.  Just like any issue in a marriage with children, the court could take into consideration how the parties addressed such a transition with their children and/or the impact on the children.  Although we have no caselaw in Texas regarding a custody dispute involving a transgender parent, it is important to note that the best interest of the child standard includes an examination of the following factors:

  1. Which party can best provide for the child’s physical, psychological, and emotional needs and development;
  2. The cooperation between the parents; and
  3. The child’s preferences.

These are just a few items that the court may consider, but should demonstrate why this is a case and fact specific analysis.

For more information, please consult an attorney to discuss the issue.

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